#Yumlicious!, Farmer's Market, Food, The Weight-ing Game, They Way {Weigh) I See It, Weight Watchers, Weight Watchers ... The Way I See It

My Weight Watchers. My Way … I Know it’s Not Summer

 Good afternoon My Phat Friends

This morning I’ve done something that most of us save for the weekend…. slept in …. very late *blushing*.  Usually I’m up at the crack of dawn.  Waaaay before the dawn.  I blame a super duper looong work day yesterday.  Didn’t turn in until well past midnight … now that I’m thinking about it, it was almost dawn!

After being awakened by the warmth from a ray of sun that had found its way through the closed blinds (the idea of traipsing around in the heat of the day was soon erased by the reality of the recent snowpocalypse that loomed on the other side of those same blinds!) I decided that today would be a good… No.  A “GREAT ” day to do absolutely nothing but veg-out on my favorite foodie shows.   It was while I was watching Ina, The Barefoot Contessa, that I stumbled upon what would eventually become my meal for the afternoon.  You see, during her show, she showcased a chef friend of hers from New York- I don’t remember his name – who grew these wonderful tomatoes and made even more wonderfuller  *is that a word?… hunching my shoulders* tomatoe salads.  They made this beautiful tomato salad

BX0401H_heirloom-tomatoes-with-tarragon_s4x3

That gave me an idea.  I remembered that I had just bought a few kumatoes from the market.  At the time that I bought them, I was not really sure how I wanted to use them.  Today seemed just as good as any day.

My salad was going to  be just a little bit different than Ina and her friend’s.  I started out with arugula {can’t get enough of the smooth and subtle spicy flavor} that I seasoned lightly with fresh ground pepper and kosher salt

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Added a just a littttttle bit of shredded Asiago Cheese {I’m starting to get used to my new vegetable cutter  *smile*

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Sliced up some cherry and kumato tomatoes that I seasoned with Tarragon – instead of the usual Basil {this little tidbit I learned today from Ina and her friend}.  According to Ina, Tarragon has the flavor that is a hint of anise.

This is where my salad is a little different than Ina’s … I added carrots, chicken and this mix that I pre-make and add to most of my salads {it’s made up of chia seeds, walnuts, dried unsalted pepitas and dried cranberries}

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This is what happened when everything is all thrown together…

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… add a good read and the mandatory Cup of Jo’

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Oh yes… I didn’t use any salad dressing.  The juice and sweetness from the kumatoes and the cranberries gave it a nice taste.  And, just as Ina and her friend said, the Tarragon was definitely the star of the show!

What do you do on your ‘lazy days’?

… do tell ….

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Blog Luv!, Farmer's Market, Food, Inspiration, WeekEnd Luv

Friday {Food} Porn:: Kale Yeahhh!! & Have a Happy Long Weekend!

Hello Luv-lies,

Have a Great Looooong Weekend!!!

hop scotch old school flavor

What exciting plans do you have for this, the last weekend of the summer? My plans have me sticking pretty close to home this holiday weekend. Lots of farmer’s market visits, reading, relaxing and napping :).

Picked up this little gem to help me tote my ‘vacay’ market finds home this weekend & as a reminder to eat more veggies.

eat more kale

It’s made of jute, so it should be hold up pretty good to my food finds. And to the washings between shops!

eat more kale1Loads of room inside for all of my goodies!

Yeeeeahhh!

eat more kale2

What’s on your ‘to buy’ list?

Come back and….

Do Tell….

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#Yumlicious!, Clean Eating, Farmer's Market, Food, Garden, Inspiration, Nutrition, Recipe, WeekEnd Luv

‘Top Chef’ … for a moment

Hello Luv-lies,

Hope that your weekend was a relaxing one.

I spent most of the weekend lazy-ing around scouring through my many stockpiled magazines.   The mags run the gamut – fashion, interior design, business, science, catalogs (loads of catalogs) and, of course, food! (even more loads of these)!  Now, over the year (or three), I’ve taken to tearing out pictures of the most enticing recipes with inflated intentions to ‘some day [I’m going to] make this’.  My cyber recipe box consists of Pins and/or saves to the recipe section of my Evernote folder.

Just wanted to make this  quick Monday post.

When I  posted all of this deliciousness on Facebook, I got a good deal of requests to post the recipe.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Pepper

 

After an early morning run to the market where picked up all of this summer seasonal goodness, I recall one of those stowed-away recipes.  Didn’t use all of the goodies from the market run, just most.

Great 'Get' at the Market

* Those are oysters mushrooms in the lower left corner … got that question a lot too:/

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By the end of my ‘Top Chef’ cooking moment, I had this savory and flavorful little ditty:

Turkey and Quinoa Stuffed Pepper with Roasted Tomatillo Avocado Sauce

 PEPPER

~~~   ~~~   ~~~   ~~~   ~~~

This pic is of the finished Stuffed Pepper as it appeared in the recipe {along with the some of the individual ingredients}

Turkey & Quinoa Stuffed Pepper

And now for the Recipe…

 Don’t like or have Quinoa on hand?

You can use any kind of grains or rice.  This dish will love it!  Trust me.

 

While all of that is simmering, you can turn you’re attention to the making the ‘dish topper’ — The Roasted Tomatillo Avocado Sauce

So How’d  You Do?

Isn’t it Yumlicious?!

I’ll definitely be making this again.  Will you?

… do tell?

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#Yumlicious!, Farmer's Market, Food, Garden, Mindful Eating, Nutrition

Making your Produce Safe… Tips

Happy Thursday, Luv-lies,

I think that we’ve seen the end of below 32 degree days ( and even colder nights) for a few months.  Yeeeeeah!!!  *Clapping hands*

As a matter of fact, over the last few weeks, I’ve seen the early signs of Spring…. tulips, daffodils, and the re-opening of Farmer’s Markets.  I can hardly stand the wait to get my hands on the fresh fruits & veggies from my local Farmer’s Market.  I’m looking forward to taking it all in…. the hustle of other eager market goers, the crisp new air of a changing season, supporting the local farming community, meeting up with neighbors, and of course, ALL of the fresh sights & smells and of this seasons wonderful produce.

It’s all quite cathartic… I think….

 

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All of this goodness has a much more serious side.   These jewels of the earth, if not handled properly, carry some risks.

So here are a few tips that will help to keep you healthy while you enjoy nature’s yumlicious  goodies !

Enjoy!!!

Five general produce safety rules

  1. Start with a clean kitchen, including cutting surfaces, colander, knives and sink.
  2. Wash your hands well before, during & between handling produce.
  3. Rinse produce under cold running tap water. In some cases, you’ll want to use a brush for extra cleaning (i.e. potatoes, mushrooms, yams, etc).
  4. Blot dry with a paper towel or clean cloth to further reduce any ‘bugs’ that may be left after the first rinse.
  5. Wash fruits and vegetables right before you plan to eat them. Washing and then storing them can promote mold and bacterial growth…. and who needs that?!

 

Nine more produce safety tips

  • Scrub firmer produce like potatoes, carrots, and cucumbers with a vegetable brush under running water to get at pathogens that may be in grooves or sticking to any waxy coating. For softer produce, like tomatoes, peppers, and peaches, rub them gently with your hands under running water. It’s often recommended that mushrooms be simply wiped with a wet paper towel or soft mushroom brush—but if needed, rinsing or spraying them with water, briefly and gently, is okay, too.
  • With melons, wash the rind well before cutting to prevent any bacteria on the surface from being transferred to the inside by the knife blade.
  • Yes, do wash your bananas—at least if you are going to handle the flesh. They could have bacteria on the peel. The same goes for oranges, lemons, avocados, mangoes and other fruits with skins or rinds that you peel with your hands or cut with a knife.
  • Discard the outer leaves of lettuce. Rinse even the tightly packed leaves in the interior, individually when possible. You can use a salad spinner to dry them. One way to clean loose gritty greens, like spinach, is to immerse them in a large pot of cool water and allow a minute or two for debris to sink to the bottom; then lift out the leaves, rinse them in a colander, and spin dry.
  • To clean berries, first pull off any leafy stems where bacteria may be lurking. Place in a colander and rinse or spray with water, shaking them gently. Blot dry gently. Some salad spinners come with special inserts to dry berries (and herbs).
  • To wash herbs, dip and swish them in a bowl of water.
  • Don’t use soap and detergents. They can leave residues that affect the taste and may not be safe to ingest. Special produce washes are expensive and not proven to be more effective than washing with water.
  • Be aware of bruises. Bruised areas on produce may harbor bacteria. If there’s a small bruise, cut away a large section around it before washing. If there is significant bruising, especially on small fruits and vegetables like berries and grapes, toss them altogether.
  • Wash organic fruits and vegetables as you wash conventionally grown produce. The same is true of locally grown produce and even produce from your own garden.

 

I hope that this info is helpful….

Do Tell….

 

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#Yumlicious!, Clean Eating, Farmer's Market, Food, Nutrition

Find Your Balance : Snack Smart

Hello Luv-lies,

This is interesting.

Art Bananas

Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.

Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes. But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.

DEPRESSION

bananas help depression

According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

PMS: Forget the pills – eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

ANEMIA High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

BLOOD PRESSURE: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit’s ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

BRAIN POWER

bananas help brain power

200 students at a Twickenham school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

CONSTIPATION High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.

HEARTBURN Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

MORNING SICKNESS Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

MOSQUITO BITES: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

HANGOVERS

bananas good for hangovers

One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

NERVES Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.. Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

ULCERS The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chroniclercases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

TEMPERATURE CONTROL Many other cultures see bananas as a ‘cooling’ fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.

So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has FOUR TIMES the protein, TWICE the carbohydrate, THREE TIMES the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around so maybe it’s time to change that well-known phrase to, “A BANANA a day keeps the doctor away!”

Bananacheer

Source: karenstan.net

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#NaBloPoMo, Farmer's Market, Friendships, NaBloPoMO, Randomness, WeekEnd Luv

No Problem

one of the few things that I look forward to on the weekend is my Sunday visit to the local farmer’s market.
this market is not your run-of-the-mill super-mega-gigunda market.
it’s your good old-fashioned country market where you’re greeted at the door by a local farmer and the aroma of seasonal fruit.

 a country market where there is a free cup of warm apple cider to cut the chill of a  blustery winter.

  and

  a fresh-squeezed cup of lemonade, sold by the neighborhood children, to quench your thirst in the heat of the summer.

customer-service1

a country market where homemade bread is baked daily and the only thing more tempting than spending an hour catching up on the latest neighborhood happenings is the smell of freshly roasted coffee grounds.

and, although a seemingly small thing, the entire staff is well over twenty-five years of age.

that seemingly insignificant detail makes it more pleasant because you do not have to endure the lackadaisical disposition of today’s youth –
who have somehow managed to escape learning the fundamental lessons of social grace and respectful people skills.

Happy Sunday, Luv-lies

How did you spend your Sunday?

Do tell …..

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Farmer's Market, Food, Mindful Eating

Garlic Scapes and other Farmer’s Market Goodies

Garlic Scapes and Farmer's Market GoodiesThe area Farmer’s Market is slowly growing. I was more successful than last week with my marketing efforts :-). The sites and smells are ‘to die for’ and with so many fresh produce items to chose from, dinner should be easy and nutritious.

Thank goodness that I did not bring more than $40 – I wanted to buy some of everything! Here are just a few things that I did put in my bag….

** Organically grown lettuce
** More of that oh-so delish homemade Chai Tea
** Garlic Scapes {never heard of them, but, according to the vendor, you use them
just like you would use a green onion…okay.}
** Fresh homemade chicken salad {all of the ingredients brings that to 6PPV –
that’s with the fresh homemade roll. YUMM}
** Organically grown strawberries, turnips, kale greens and rutabaga
** Spice-infused couscous and black bean soup

Not bad for a 30 minute walk through the market….

What’s on your plate tonight?
Do share

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